Northeast Wisconsin
  • Northeast Wisconsin
  • January 2016
Written by 

Hobbies and your health go hand in hand

The holidays have come and gone for another year, and January is upon us. Did you know that January boasts more than just the kick off to a new year? January is National Hobby Month. As you relax following the holiday season reconnecting with one of your favorite hobbies is an excellent way to unwind your mind. Dr. Peter Lichtenber, Ph.D, from Wayne State University states that people who have a hobby “are generally healthier. We also know they are at a lower risk for depression and dementia. The great value of hobbies is they’re a way for people to stay engaged on multiple levels.”

So what qualifies as a hobby? A hobby is any activity done for enjoyment and pleasure, most often done outside of the workplace on your own time. A hobby is a “get to do it” activity, not a “have to do it” daily life requirement. The following is a fun list of hobbies compiled by NotSoBoringLife.com:

The 50 most popular hobbies

  1. Reading
  2. Watching TV
  3. Family time
  4. Going to movies
  5. Fishing
  6. Computer
  7. Gardening
  8. Renting movies
  9. Walking
  10. Exercise
  11. Listening to music
  12. Entertaining
  13. Hunting
  14. Team sports
  15. Shopping
  16. Traveling
  17. Sleeping
  18. Socializing
  19. Sewing
  20. Golf
  21. Church activities
  22. Relaxing
  23. Playing music
  24. Housework
  25. Crafts
  26. Watching sports
  27. Bicycling
  28. Playing cards
  29. Hiking
  30. Cooking
  31. Eating out
  32. Dating online
  33. Swimming
  34. Camping
  35. Skiing
  36. Working on cars
  37. Writing
  38. Boating
  39. Motorcycling
  40. Animal care
  41. Bowling
  42. Painting
  43. Running
  44. Dancing
  45. Horseback riding
  46. Tennis
  47. Theatre
  48. Billiards
  49. Beach
  50. Volunteer work

You may have noticed that antiquing, knitting, board games, meditating, flower arranging, going to garage sales or starting a collection are not on the list. Point being that when it comes to selecting a hobby, your choice, your passion, your interest is the only guideline to follow.

Let’s kindle your motivation to make time for your hobby by sharing information from Michael Brickey who authored the book, “Defy Aging.” He reports that hobbies serve three purposes. First, hobbies engage our passion or enthusiasm, getting our creative juices flowing. Next, hobbies provide a mini break and distraction from our daily lives. Thirdly, hobbies give us a sense of purpose and accomplishment.

Just in case you are still not convinced to make some time in your schedule to enjoy your favorite interest or activity, here are some additional benefits to pursuing a hobby. The time spent engaged in your passion can reduce blood pressure, relieve stress, reduce anxiety and give your mood a boost. Hobbies can provide the much needed alone time we need to recharge our batteries or regain perspective. On the other hand, depending on the hobby you might have the opportunity to meet new people, share ideas and feel a sense of connection you otherwise might not have.

Creating time to enjoy a hobby can be the best after the holiday gift you give yourself. The slogan for January, National Hobby Month, could be:

“Hobbies add interest to our lives and make us more interesting people to be with.” —Jaycquilin Marshall 


References: “How Hobbies Help Your Heath.” Metrowest Medical Center. http://www.mwmc.com/medical-services/behavioral-health/health-library/behvioral-health/how-hobbies-help-your-health

Marshall, J. (2014, January 18). “Mental Health and Hobbies: A Dynamic Duo.” PsyWeb.com. J. Marshall.http://www.psyweb.com/lifestyle/mental-health/mental-health-and-hobbies-a-dynamic-duo.

Sharon Paprocki MAC, LPC, NBCC

Sharon Paprocki MAC, LPC, NBCC, is the director of CCM Counseling & Wellness. Her passion is to provide people an option for their healing that includes talk therapy along with additional interventions that focus on mind, spirit, and body wholeness and vitality. She truly believes that this holistic combination allows her clients to explore and engage all their strengths while healing, changing and growing. She has additional training in body-centered approaches to healing, mindfulness processing and spiritual exploration therapies that clients can opt to investigate during their sessions. As director of CCM, she has brought on staff Reiki, reflexology and massage practitioners who can give clients the opportunity to support themselves and embrace their emerging life of wholeness.

“I believe your hurts can be healed and new insights can light your path to the future you desire. I look forward to meeting you.”

For an appointment, call 920-498-3383 or visit http://www.ccmcounseling.com.

Website: www.ccmcounseling.com
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