Northeast Wisconsin
  • Northeast Wisconsin
  • June 2017
Written by 

Managing credit when buying a car

Many people in the market for new vehicles intend to lease or finance a car once they find the make and model they want. Such an approach will necessitate a credit check.

Credit checks make some consumers, even those who have relatively good credit, uncomfortable. But when managed well, credit and checks on individuals’ credit ratings can go smoothly and save drivers considerable amounts of money over the life of their leases and auto loans.

Don’t leave room for surprises. Even consumers who feel they have firm grasps on their credit scores should check their scores before they go shopping for leases or auto loans. Reports may contain errors that can affect the interest rates lenders are willing to give lessees or borrowers. Fixing mistakes in advance of shopping for a car ensures drivers they will get the best interest rate and loan terms possible for someone in their financial standing.

Clean up a score if it falls short of expectations. Buyers who don’t know their credit scores may be disappointed if those scores come back lower than they expected. Numerous factors, be it missed payments or high debt-to-credit ratios, can lower credit scores. Even buyers with good jobs and money in the bank may not have good credit scores. When possible, buyers with low credit scores should wait until they can improve their scores before shopping for a lease or loan. The higher buyers’ credit scores, the lower their interest rate will likely be, saving them considerable amounts of money over the life of their lease or loan.

Wait before having your credit run. Some auto dealers may want to run prospective buyers’ credit histories the moment those buyers step onto their lots, but it pays for consumers to be patient and wait until they have found a vehicle they like before agreeing to a credit check. Each time a person applies for credit, his or her credit score dips. But according to Bankrate.com, applicants who file all of their loan applications within one two-week period will only have those applications count as a single credit inquiry.

Don’t overdo it. Buyers with great credit scores may be tempted to stretch their automotive budgets. But drivers who spend more they can afford may soon find that their excellent credit ratings are suffering. Stay on budget so payments can be made on time and credit scores stay strong.

Buying or leasing a new vehicle can be made easier when buyers enter the process with strong credit scores. 

Source: MetroCreative Connection.

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