Healthy Concepts

The World Health Organization (WHO) recently released information focusing on the number of people with diabetes, and how that number has more than quadrupled since 1980. What this means is that 400 million people across the globe are now suffering with this chronic disease. It is estimated that this costs more than $820 billion annually. In addition to this finding, WHO linked the rise in diabetes to the rise in obesity. Basically, the lifestyles we are living are killing us. 

With numbers this big, it raises a question, “What are you doing to protect yourself from this chronic disease?” Many people aren’t doing anything. Often, we tell ourselves that we will start living a healthier lifestyle tomorrow, but for many people tomorrow comes too late, if at all. It is time to start acting in favor of improving yourself today, not tomorrow. 

There is so much information out there, where do I begin?

This is a problem that many of us face when trying to turn a new leaf in the interest of our health and well-being. Look, there is a ton of information out there about a wide variety of subjects, all claiming that it is “the way” to become healthy. The truth is, there is no one way to become healthy. The proper route to really living a healthy lifestyle is incorporating a combination of different things — from eating a proper diet, exercising, getting enough sleep and managing stress. 

Most importantly, it is about the food you are putting into your body daily. Think of it this way, to get the greatest longevity out of your vehicle’s engine, it is important to get regular oil changes and use a higher-grade oil. If you don’t take care of your vehicle, and use the worst oil just because it is cheap, the lifespan of your vehicle will be much less. It is the same way with your body — if you keep putting the inexpensive, processed foods filled with additives, chemicals, dyes, etc. into your body, your lifespan will be much shorter as well. This does not mean you need to join a fancy program where you’re drinking shakes instead of eating meals, or counting points instead of looking at ingredients. Learning how to eat all the whole, low-glycemic foods in a healthy balance is the best way to go. 

Focusing on supporting people’s health through evidence-based medicine (risks versus benefits of medications) and healing therapies through nutrition can transform lives through clinically proven methods of nutritional healing. Nutrition counselors have extensive experience working with clients who have weight and fatigue issues, sports nutrition, food sensitivities and allergies, along with general health concerns such as high blood pressure, glucose issues, cholesterol/triglyceride issues, thyroid conditions, and irritable bowel disorders. They focus on the study of nutrition as a complementary medicine.

If you are ready to change your life through some education and hard work, then it is time to contact the team at Nutritional Healing. They offer many different program options, testing services, corporate wellness programs and much more. Make an appointment for a free consult today, and take the first steps in ensuring your very own longevity! 

To learn more about Nutritional Healing LLC, call 920-358-5764 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..">This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

 

The World Health Organization (WHO) recently released information focusing on the number of people with diabetes, and how that number has more than quadrupled since 1980. What this means is that 400 million people across the globe are now suffering with this chronic disease. It is estimated that this costs more than $820 billion annually. In addition to this finding, WHO linked the rise in diabetes to the rise in obesity. Basically, the lifestyles we are living are killing us. 

With numbers this big, it raises a question, “What are you doing to protect yourself from this chronic disease?” Many people aren’t doing anything. Often, we tell ourselves that we will start living a healthier lifestyle tomorrow, but for many people tomorrow comes too late, if at all. It is time to start acting in favor of improving yourself today, not tomorrow. 

There is so much information out there, where do I begin?

This is a problem that many of us face when trying to turn a new leaf in the interest of our health and well-being. Look, there is a ton of information out there about a wide variety of subjects, all claiming that it is “the way” to become healthy. The truth is, there is no one way to become healthy. The proper route to really living a healthy lifestyle is incorporating a combination of different things — from eating a proper diet, exercising, getting enough sleep and managing stress. 

Most importantly, it is about the food you are putting into your body daily. Think of it this way, to get the greatest longevity out of your vehicle’s engine, it is important to get regular oil changes and use a higher-grade oil. If you don’t take care of your vehicle, and use the worst oil just because it is cheap, the lifespan of your vehicle will be much less. It is the same way with your body — if you keep putting the inexpensive, processed foods filled with additives, chemicals, dyes, etc. into your body, your lifespan will be much shorter as well. This does not mean you need to join a fancy program where you’re drinking shakes instead of eating meals, or counting points instead of looking at ingredients. Learning how to eat all the whole, low-glycemic foods in a healthy balance is the best way to go. 

Focusing on supporting people’s health through evidence-based medicine (risks versus benefits of medications) and healing therapies through nutrition can transform lives through clinically proven methods of nutritional healing. Nutrition counselors have extensive experience working with clients who have weight and fatigue issues, sports nutrition, food sensitivities and allergies, along with general health concerns such as high blood pressure, glucose issues, cholesterol/triglyceride issues, thyroid conditions, and irritable bowel disorders. They focus on the study of nutrition as a complementary medicine.

If you are ready to change your life through some education and hard work, then it is time to contact the team at Nutritional Healing. They offer many different program options, testing services, corporate wellness programs and much more. Make an appointment for a free consult today, and take the first steps in ensuring your very own longevity! 

To learn more about Nutritional Healing LLC, call 920-358-5764 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..">This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

 

Society as a whole is starting to pay more attention to what we are feeding our bodies and considering the idea of food as a medicine. Food sensitivities have stepped into the spotlight as more and more people are identifying the direct connection between what we are eating and how our bodies are performing. Research has demonstrated the need to take food sensitivities seriously because left untreated, a food sensitivity can lead to chronic illness.

What is a food sensitivity?

As the body breaks down the food we ingest, protein fragments can be mislabeled as foreign invaders in need of being “destroyed.” This triggers an immune response, which creates inflammation in the body. This is a food sensitivity. You might experience bloating, gas, upset stomach or diarrhea as the body tries to eliminate these “invaders.” These symptoms pass relatively quickly, but your body is still experiencing inflammation caused by the immune response. When your body is exposed to a continuous inflammatory response (even low-grade inflammation), you are susceptible to disease and accelerated aging.

Food allergies versus food sensitivities

A true food allergy is characterized by an almost immediate response of the body, such as itchiness, runny eyes and nose, and trouble breathing. A food sensitivity will take longer to manifest itself and is often missed because the symptoms are usually cumulative and attributed to something other than a food you may have consumed hours or days prior. Food sensitivities often present themselves in the form of migraines or headaches, irritability, foggy thinking, bloated of puffiness, skin problems, and irregular bowel habits. Dr. David Blywiess, Chief Medical Officer at Cell Science Systems (the makers of ALCAT testing) estimates that over 80 percent of the human population has a food sensitivity of some degree. Only 5 percent of these people have a true food allergy.

Identifying the culprits

An elimination diet is one of the tools recommended in identifying foods that cause you issues. This means you eliminate certain foods for a period of time (usually 3 to 4 weeks) and then reintroduce them slowly and monitor symptoms to identify possible reactions. This is done by keeping a food journal. This is really helpful for identifying the big offenders such as gluten, dairy and soy. The elimination diet can be time consuming and difficult when you consider the dozens of other foods you eat that don’t fall into the “big offenders” category. This is when food allergy testing might be recommended. We have trusted the science behind the ALCAT testing for many years. They are considered the gold standard for testing allergies and sensitivities to food, chemicals and molds, because they use a live blood cell test instead of the typical IgG test. The live blood cell tests measures reactions as the various elements are introduced, while the IgG test is a dead blood test that measures antibodies and pieces together an incomplete picture of possible food sensitivities based on the number of antibodies found in that particular blood sample. If the patient hasn’t been exposed to a certain food, chemical or mold for an extended period then it can be missed.

Good nutrition is crucial for health and wellness. Feeding your body what it needs to thrive is important to how we feel and age. That is why it is part of each patient’s customized wellness plan at Wise Woman Wellness. To find out more, please visit us on the web at WiseWomanWellness.com.

Your daily skin care routine most likely starts and ends with washing your face. While cleansing seems like it should be the least complicated part of your skin care routine, certain face washing habits can lead to numerous skin issues including irritation, oiliness and even acne breakouts. Let’s countdown the eight common face washing mistakes; knowing how to correct these mistakes can work wonders for your overall skin health:

8. You exfoliate more than you should

While exfoliation is a healthy practice to remove dead skin cells, the key is to not exfoliate too often. Exfoliating a maximum of two times a week is plenty to remove dead skin cells, but not irritate your skin.

7. You’re using the wrong product

The right cleanser should completely remove dirt, makeup and dead cells, but not be too harsh that it removes your skin’s natural oils and healthy cells. Choose a cleanser that is neither too gentle where you have to scrub multiple times nor too harsh where it leaves your skin red and dry.

6. You’re washing with the wrong water temperature

There is a skin myth out there that says hot water opens pores while cold water closes them. The truth is that pores don’t have the ability to open and close. Lukewarm water is the best for gently cleansing your skin. Too hot water can lead to over-dry skin.

5. You skimp on the face rinse

In a world where time is limited and moving too fast, it is easy to rinse too quickly. Skimping on the rinse can lead to residue build up, which clogs pores and dries out the skin. The jawline, hairline and nose are common spots to get missed during rinsing.

4. You have poor towel habits

When drying off with a towel the key is to pat, not rub. While rubbing is easier and more soothing, it tugs and pulls on your skin putting your skin’s elastin at risk. It is also important to never share towels. Designating your own towel helps prevent bacteria from spreading from person to person.

3. You aren’t sure when to moisturize

A common question is whether you should moisturize while your skin is wet or dry. To maximize absorption and help seal in moisturizer it is important to apply moisturizer immediately after cleansing while the skin is still damp.

2. You wash your skin too often

Generally, washing your skin once or twice a day is a good standard to follow. Any more than that will lead to irritated skin and usually an overproduction of oil. If your day involved no makeup, sunscreen or sweat you can skip the cleanser that night and just rinse your face with water. Giving your skin a break from time to time is healthy.

1. You don’t ever wash your face

The number one face washing mistake is that you never wash it! While most people would probably never verbally admit to this, I know there are a decent number of women who still go to bed with their makeup on. You can blame it on being tired or forgetting to do it, but not removing the day’s buildup of oil, dirt and makeup can lead to acne, more prominent pores and inflammation. Always remember to end your day with a gentle face washing, even if it’s with just water, to allow your skin room to breathe while you sleep.

Parenthood is a community, a tribe that unites its members like no other. Having children and all associated with it — the stresses, the joys and even the fears — connect mothers and fathers with their peers in a way that’s natural and often unspoken. What is clear, though, is the kind of reassurance often felt when one interacts with a fellow parent who has also experienced a particular issue or has had a similar concern regarding their children’s well-being.

It’s no different with doctors. The board-certified dermatologists of Forefront Dermatology are held in high esteem in their industry in every aspect of their careers; however, they’re humans too. Several are parents, and that means they too have had questions about their children’s health and safety.

They understand.

Empathizing with patients as parents

Forefront Dermatology currently has 36 locations throughout Wisconsin where they expertly address a wide spectrum of conditions and concerns, including acne, eczema, rashes, warts, psoriasis and rosacea, along with cosmetic treatments.

They’ve also become an industry expert on treating basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and less common skin cancers through a highly specialized procedure called Mohs micrographic surgery. The level of medical care and technique is unmatched, and it’s also complemented by their dedication to providing patients with compassionate care, education and personalized treatments throughout a patient’s journey.

With this awareness in mind, it can be easy to categorize your Forefront dermatologist as simply a medical figure. We forget that they’re community members, neighbors, pet owners and parents. They’re just like us!

Dr. Peter Katz and his wife, Murissa, have three children: William (12), Dane (10) and Livian (8). And as any parent can attest, their children differ in personality and development. What Dr. Katz recognizes as both a board-certified dermatologist and a father is that their skin is vastly diverse as well.

“Dane has had the most skin issues,” he explains. “He was born with a rare congenital skin tumor called mastocytoma… he has eczema and has had a lot of medication reactions. He’s also had scarlet fever three times — he’s kept me on my toes! And when I do see patients with the same issues, I can give them some idea of what to expect on a day-to-day basis and not just what’s in the textbook.”

Dr. Susan Keiler and her husband, David Johnson, parents of 11-week-old daughter, Kathleen, know that skin care and its significance are already prominent even at this early stage of parenthood, bringing with it an overall cognizance of what might be going through her fellow parent patients’ minds.

“Kathleen has already had a few skin issues arise since she has been born,” Dr. Keiler says. “As a pediatric dermatologist, I felt added pressure to get her diaper rash and acne under control quickly. In this short time, I have realized it can be very hard to be patient when you are treating your own child. You (and family members) want them to get better overnight but that is sometimes not realistic.”

Dr. Christopher Burnett and his wife, Mary, are the parents of three daughters: Sophia (7), Clara (4) and Lillian (10 months). Dr. Burnett identifies that being prepared with a plan and providing a strategy can go a long way with children and their parents when it comes to providing the highest level of care.

“A treatment plan and oftentimes simple reassurance can make a big difference in your child’s skin health,” Dr. Burnett says. “Don’t hesitate to seek an evaluation by a board-certified dermatologist for any skin concerns in your child.”

Sometimes the uncertainties can feel overwhelming, and Drs. Katz, Keiler and Burnett recognize that in this day and age the internet and “what ifs” don’t help alleviate those anxieties. It’s perfectly normal to worry — they do it too.

“A lot of the time I see parents come in and they go to the worst case scenario right away,” Dr. Katz says. “And we understand that. As a parent and a doctor, I find myself doing that same thing. But we also have a base of knowledge to know if something is very rare or how likely or unlikely those things are.”

Creating a partnership in your child’s skin health journey

Consistency is key.

It’s a phrase we’ve heard time and time again, and applies to almost every facet of life. If you want to make something a habit, you must be constant in your approach. When it comes to sun protection, the dermatologists at Forefront Dermatology believe nothing is truer or more significant in terms of long-term well-being — and that begins in infancy.

While outside with your newborn, Dr. Keiler recommends protective hats and tight woven clothing, and limited sun exposure during peak intensity hours (from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.). For infants older than 6 months, she urges regular use of sunscreen with a sun protection factor of at least 30, containing the ingredients zinc oxide and/or titanium dioxide, which are less irritating to the skin.

“Sun avoidance alone is advised in infants younger than 6 months of age due to the greater risk of absorption of the chemicals in sunscreen and lack of safety testing of sunscreens in this age group,” she says. “(At a young age) the best thing you can do for your child’s skin health is to practice very good sun protection. It is important to use sun protective clothing starting at birth (surf guards, hats) and use sunscreen. Glitter sunscreen — sold at our Manitowoc and Sheboygan Falls offices — can make putting on sunscreen fun for children age 2-10.”

“My biggest advice is teaching kids to make protecting yourself from the sun a way of life, a routine,” Dr. Katz says. “Don’t make it a once in a while thing. My kids know that before they go outside to go swimming, they need their sunscreen and swim shirt on. It’s engrained in their heads and it’s just what they do.”

“My four-year old knows the importance of using sunscreen to prevent sunburn,” Dr. Burnett adds. “We’ve been able to educate my seven-year old on the importance of using sunscreen to prevent skin cancer. We hope that the habits we are encouraging now will result in lifelong sun safety practices.”

As children grow and evolve, so does their skin and the potential for hormones and aging to bring conditions like acne.

Whether it’s discomfort that is often associated with acne in young adults, or perhaps an unfamiliarity with how a particular skin type or condition looks, children being exposed to differences requires support. The dermatologists at Forefront Dermatology are the ideal team to help maintain your child’s skin health, and also encourage you to get involved to partner in the effort — both from an emotional and dermatologic standpoint.

“As a pediatric dermatologist, I recommend parents talk to their children early about their birthmark or skin condition and not discuss it in a negative way,” Dr. Keiler says. “I have parents refer to birthmarks as beauty marks. Usually young children (4-6 years of age) are more curious as they start seeing differences between their skin and the skin of their peers.

“There is also a summer camp for children who are struggling socially with their skin condition (Camp Discovery and Camp Horizon). These camps allow children to interact with other children with similar conditions in a nonthreatening safe environment.”

“Skin issues can be difficult socially, especially in the case of common conditions like acne and eczema,” Dr. Burnett explains. “It’s important for parents and kids to know that help is available in the form of a good, personalized treatment plan.”

Strategies for parents to help their children stay consistent in their skin health routines include keeping the ointment or cream on your child’s nightstand or moisturizer near their towels in the bathroom. That way, the dermatologists say, a conscious decision to not use the products has to be made rather than to use the excuse that it was forgotten.

Text reminders and alerts on phones are another measure they suggest to ensure children stay consistent whether taking medication or applying topical treatments.

“It’s also important to drive home the point that a lot of treatments we give for a lot of conditions are not for the acne you have now, for example, but it’s to be used steadily for weeks,” Dr. Katz explains. “Your consistency now is going to pay off later.” 

“Kids don’t understand that what they’re doing now makes a difference down the road,” Dr. Katz says. “They’ll feel a sunburn but then five days later forget about it. They don’t realize that it leads to skin cancer and other problems.”


For more information about Forefront Dermatology and to find a location near you, visit www.forefrontdermatology.com or call 855-535-7175.

“Our deep respect for the land and its harvest is the legacy of generations of farmers who put food on our tables,preserved our landscape and inspired us with a powerful work ethic.” —James H. Douglas, Jr.

Summer is in its final stretch now, and many people are out enjoying the great warm weather and taking advantage of sunny days to relax, enjoy outdoor family gatherings travel all over Wisconsin to see the beauty of our great state. Farmers, on the other hand, are busy during this prime harvest season gathering the bounty of their fields and planning ahead for the following year’s crops.

Nature’s Pathways wants to say thank you to the farmers who work year-round to provide not only for their families but for us, the community.

We depend on local farms to provide us with the freshest, nutrient-packed foods that are far superior to the produce that is picked before it is truly ripe because it has to take a 1,000-mile train or truck ride to get here. Sometimes it sits for another week before it gets to the grocery store shelves waiting for us to buy it. With that being said, who hasn’t noticed the difference between a juicy, sweet apple picked off a tree as opposed to the apple you buy at the supermarket from Washington or New York? The taste and nutritional value don’t compare.

We also must thank our readers for participating in local CSA and farm share programs and for finding them at farmers markets in the area. If you haven’t yet participated in a CSA, now is the time to be looking ahead to 2018! If you found yourself at your weekly farmers market buying the majority of your vegetables and fruits, maybe it is time to look into the option of having weekly deliveries of the best seasonal produce, even stepping outside of your comfort zone and preparing new vegetables that are foreign to you.

I personally never ate kale until a couple years ago. Why? Because my mother never bought it or prepared it. When I worked at Wendy’s in high school, kale was the big green leaves I had to pack over the ice on the salad bar for looks. I never thought of it as a food. Now I can’t be without it. Whether it is oven roasted with a little olive oil and garlic, or dehydrated coated with a cashew, lemon and nutritional yeast paste — which makes it crunchy just like a chip — or even sautéed with my morning eggs. I can thank local farmers for introducing me to one of my now favorite vegetables!

It is not too late (or too early) to have a conversation with local farmers about the programs they have available next year. They accommodate all family sizes so don’t be afraid if you are a family of three or a family of eight. If you gained anything from our Nature’s Pathways “We support Community Supported Agriculture!” series we hope it is that farmers are devoted to their way of life and sharing it with everyone they can to make a difference, even though it means they do all the work.

Thank you!

—Karen Grams

Check out these local CSA farm share programs!

Farm:

Where to find:

Types of shares:

Featured items:

About the farm:

Burr Oak Gardens, LLC

W5511 County Road B, Rio

920-992-3643

burroakgardens.com

CSA pick up sites located near Appleton North High School and at Goodwill North Central Wisconsin in Menasha on Thursdays, June 15 through October 26 (20-week season).

Mini share, Basic share, Double share, Double Every-other-week and Late Fall Storage share.

Fruits, vegetables, herbs. Honey available as an add-on in the fall.

We are certified organic through Midwest Organic Services Assocation (MOSA). We have been delivering to the Fox Cities since 2010. Our farm uses sustainable practices to produce wonderful vegetables and a few annual fruits that are suitable for growing in Wisconsin. We are always astonished by what mother nature does with a little rain, a little soil and a lot of light.

Field Notes Farm

1579 Church Street, Stevens Point

262-224-6027

fieldnotesfarm.com

Downtown Appleton Farm Market, Saturdays 8 a.m.-12:30 p.m.;

Future Neenah Farm Market, Saturdays 8 a.m.-noon;

Downtown Stevens Point Farm Market, Saturdays 8 a.m.-1 p.m.;

Pulse Young Professional's Bazaar After Dark.

Every week and every other week pick up, mid-June through mid-November.

Summer season is 18 weeks + 4 weeks of fall storage season. Each share is 3/4 bushel with 9, 11, 18 or 22-week pickups.

Work shares and Farm Artist shares available.

A variety of 8-15 household favorite vegetables each week, including weekly herb and

occasional fruits and apple cider.

We are certified organic and take pride in farming with a focus on soil health, building community and transparency. Each share features a newsletter with a story from the farmers, a list of the share's contents and simple recipes. We also have an orchard of peach, plum, pear and apricots. In the fall, we press apple cider to be fermented. We have a 5-month payment plan for our shares. Pick up sites in Appleton, Neenah, Amherst, Stevens Point and Plover.

Good Earth Farm

W8965 Oak Center Road, Oakfield

920-517-6727

goodearthfarm.net

Fond du Lac Downtown Saturday Market from 8 a.m.-noon.

Summer season CSA: Weekly Large, Medium, Small and Every-other-week shares from June through October.

Winter season CSA: November through February.

Mushroom shares and fruit add-ons available. Weekly newsletter, The ComPost, with news from the farm, great vegetable info, recipes and more!

We are a certified organic vegetable farm offering vegetable shares to the Fox Valley and surrounding areas. Our CSA is a fantastic opportunity to eat with the seasons and purchase locally from farmers who use sustainable and environmentally responsible farming methods. We offer many opportunities to see where your food grows, meet the farmers and have fun on the farm!

Oakridge Farms

125 County Road CB, Neenah

920-725-1541

oakridgeberries.com

Appleton Downtown Farm Market, Saturdays 8 a.m.-12:30 p.m.

Standard share, Half share and Market share.

Fruits and vegetables.

We are a family farm growing fruits and vegetables using sustainable farming methods. We focus on building soil health and using minimal chemical inputs on our fruit crops. We offer summer CSA shares, pick-your-own strawberries, raspberries and blackberries and offer a daily farm stand open mid-June through September.

Park Ridge Organics

N8410 Abler Road, Fond du Lac

920-979-9658

parkridgeorganics.com

Appleton Downtown Farm Market, Saturdays 8 a.m.-12:30 p.m. (our stand is on College Ave. in front of McKinney Photography).

Our on-farm store is open Monday to Saturday from June through October.

Full, Half and Quarter shares offered every week for 20 weeks (June through October). Late season shares (November and December), Winter Storage shares (January and February).

Vegetables, mushrooms, eggs (available for farm pickup only), pasta and herbs.

Park Ridge Organics has been certified organic since our beginning in 2003. It is a second-owned farm providing produce to over 300 members each season. Our farm grows high quality produce and takes strong measures to ensure food safety. With over 14 years of growing experience and soil management, our produce flavor is exceptional!

Natural Healthy Concepts is the major fulfillment of one person’s small dream.

In 2004, Theresa Groskopp opened a nutrition counseling and consulting practice in her home in the Appleton area. She acted on her strongly held belief that “your health is the best investment you’ll ever make.”

Previously, Theresa worked in the medical and social service fields after receiving a BA in Business from UW-Oshkosh, a valuable foundation for what happened next. With her ever-increasing interest in health, she juggled work and studied nutrition. She completed the Certified Nutritionist Program with the American Health Science University and is a licensed certified nutritionist.

Client interest set in motion the retailing of professional nutritional supplements in her home along with the creation of a website and online store for Natural Healthy Concepts. She also gave nutritional lectures locally with area groups and offered employee wellness information to local businesses.

Natural Healthy Concepts grew steadily largely due to Theresa’s steadfast passion — she firmly believes that the foundation of health and wellness lies in proper nutrition. Today, the business offers over 17,000 products on its website, many of which are available from its two retail outlets in Appleton and Fond du Lac. (The new Fond du Lac store location opened in July and has grand opening festivities scheduled for August 17-19.)

There’s a difference between typical vitamins and the products you’ll find at Natural Healthy Concepts. That difference is quality. The supplements it offers are scientifically researched and clinically studied, and contain the purest ingredients. Theresa seeks out reputable brands that follow Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP) and utilize socially responsible practices in the manufacture of their offerings (e.g., non-GMO, sustainably produced, cruelty free, etc.). Theresa also goes to great lengths to avoid products with artificial sweeteners, colors and flavors.

At Natural Healthy Concepts, the staff is well-aware that your busy life makes it nearly impossible to maintain healthy habits. But, the truth is, you do have a choice! Your health and well-being is in your hands. While there is no replacement for eating right and exercising, supplementation can be an excellent way to fill nutrient gaps in your diet so you can do your part to support your good health.

When you need answers to your health and nutrition questions, Natural Healthy Concepts is there to help. Its knowledgeable staff includes a certified nutritionist, registered nurse, licensed massage therapist and well-trained store associates. (It also has space available for area practitioners to see clients on a scheduled basis.)

You can shop with confidence at Natural Healthy Concepts for not only a wide variety of quality pharmaceutical-grade, professional and retail brands of nutritional supplements, vitamins, minerals, herbs and homeopathic remedies, but also a huge assortment of aromatherapy, natural skin and beauty care, sports nutrition and pet health products.

For more information, check out the online store and nutrition blog at NaturalHealthyConcepts.com. The friendly staff looks forward to seeing you at one of its stores soon! 


Natural Healthy Concepts

Visit us at one of our two convenient locations:

310 N. Westhill Boulevard in Appleton (across the street from Woodman’s)

976 E. Johnson Street in Fond du Lac (across the street from Culver’s)

M-F: 9 a.m.-8 p.m. | Sat: 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Sun: 10 a.m-4 p.m.

Come visit us at our new store in Fond du Lac!

 

Few people would pass on the opportunity to save money. Clipping coupons, redeeming discount codes and shopping sales are par for the course for the average consumer. What some may not realize is that shopping on particular days of the week or during certain times of the year can yield even greater discounts.

According to Charlie Graham, chief executive of ShopItToMe, a website that provides email alerts to consumers when their favorite items go on sale, significant price differences can be seen on a day-to-day basis, depending on the items.

As for when to shop for just about anything, the following is a guideline for getting good deals. Weekdays tend to be better than weekends for bargain hunters.

Airfare: According to the fare tracking site FareCompare.com, most airlines post domestic fare sales on Monday evening, which creates a price-matching scenario on Tuesday. Data suggests that, to get cheap seats, travelers should shop around 3 p.m. on Tuesdays.

Appliances: Big-ticket items like appliances require research and time prior to making a purchase. As a result, people tend to make these purchases over the weekend. To remain competitive, stores often discount large appliances on Sundays.

Cars: Dealerships have less leverage when customer crowds are minimal, which tends to be the case earlier in the week. The automotive resource Edmunds says that dealerships are more open to negotiating on Mondays.

Electronics: Mondays are also a great day to find deals on consumer electronics. Retailers and manufacturers often release rebate deals early in the week, enticing consumers to buy.

Jewelry and shoes: Studies have found that women tend to shop more in the middle of the week. Therefore, retailers that cater to females, including clothing stores, jewelers and handbag retailers, often discount items on Wednesdays.

Restaurant meals: Dining out reaches its peak time from Thursday through the weekend. To generate sales during slow periods, many restaurants offer specials on Tuesdays and Wednesdays. For example, “kids eat free” specials are often offered on Tuesdays. Look for other discounts, such as happy hour deals or specials geared toward “ladies night out.”

Supermarket food: New circulars are distributed weekly, and items tend to be advertised on Sunday, making this the best day to get sales. However, since prices tend to carry throughout the week, Monday also can be a good day to save and the crowds are often smaller on Mondays than Sundays.

Saving money involves knowing when to get the lowest prices on popular items. And some days of the week are simply better than others for bargain hunters. 

Over the thousands of years it’s been cultivated, flaxseed has had a variety of health and industrial uses. Around 500 B.C., Hippocrates wrote about flaxseed being a laxative, and pioneers in North America made flaxseed dressings for cuts and burns. Fiber from the plant is made into linen, and oil from the seed is used in paints, among other products.

Today, flaxseed and flaxseed oil are used as dietary supplements for constipation, diabetes, cholesterol, cancer, and other conditions.

Flaxseed is made into tablets, extracts, powder, and flour. The oil is also put in capsules.

How much do we know?

There have been a number of studies in people of flaxseed and flaxseed oil, including their effect on hot flashes.

What have we learned?

Flaxseed contains fiber, which generally helps with constipation. However, there’s little research on the effectiveness of flaxseed for constipation.

Studies of flaxseed and flaxseed oil to lower cholesterol levels have had mixed results. A 2009 research review found that flaxseed lowered cholesterol only in people with relatively high initial cholesterol levels.

Flaxseed doesn’t decrease hot flashes, studies from 2010 and 2012 suggest.

NCCIH is funding preliminary research on the potential role of substances in flaxseed for ovarian cancer, cardiovascular disease, metabolic syndrome, diabetes, asthma, and inflammation.

What do we know about safety?

Don’t eat raw or unripe flaxseeds, which may contain potentially toxic compounds.

Flaxseed and flaxseed oil supplements seem to be well tolerated in limited amounts. Few side effects have been reported.

Avoid flaxseed and flaxseed oil during pregnancy as they may have mild hormonal effects. There’s little reliable information on whether it’s safe to use flaxseed when nursing.

Flaxseed, like any fiber supplement, should be taken with plenty of water, as it could worsen constipation or, in rare cases, cause an intestinal blockage. Both flaxseed and flaxseed oil can cause diarrhea.

Tell all your health care providers about any complementary or integrative health approaches you use. Give them a full picture of what you do to manage your health. This will help ensure coordinated and safe care. 


Source: National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health. https://nccih.nih.gov/health/flaxseed/ataglance.htm.

Ingredients

Servings: One

1 tablespoon butter

2 teaspoons extra virgin olive oil, divided

1 cup red and yellow cherry (or grape) tomatoes, some halved, some left whole

1 fresh salmon fillet

1 tablespoon fresh herbs (I use thyme and oregano)

1 teaspoon capers

Juice from half a lemon

Coarse salt and freshly ground pepper

Directions

  1. Melt the butter and 1 teaspoon oil in a cast iron skillet. Once the foaming starts to subside, add the tomatoes and cook for about a minute. Add the salmon fillet, season with salt and pepper and sear on one side for three minutes. Carefully flip with a fish spatula and sear another two to the three minutes. Add the herbs and toss the tomatoes around a bit. They’ll be getting some nice brown marks by now and breaking down a bit.
  2. In the meantime, heat the remaining teaspoon oil in another small skillet. Add the spinach and wilt for about two minutes. Toss in a pinch of salt and pepper.
  3. Serve salmon and tomatoes over the wilted spinach and garnish with the capers and a huge squeeze of lemon. Enjoy! 
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